Corsair Gaming M65 FPS Gaming Mouse, Aircraft-Grade Aluminum, 8200 DPI

Corsair Gaming M65 FPS Gaming Mouse, Aircraft-Grade Aluminum, 8200 DPI

Corsair Gaming M65 FPS Gaming Mouse, Aircraft-Grade Aluminum, 8200 DPI

  • Maximum precision, ultra responsive mouse control for extended domination over players with less accurate, slower mice. Essential for pixel-smooth tracking on high resolution video settings with high-performance GPUs.
  • Designed and tuned for exceptional FPS gameplay. Features a design that is comfortable to the hand even for extended hours gaming sessions. Dedicated sniper button instantly lowers your DPI so that you can quickly and accurately aim for precise location.
  • A lightweight, high-stiffness chassis provides an excellent center of gravity because it gives you a high rigidity and optimal mass distribution – ideal for the most intense death match.
  • Instantly adjust DPI on the fly for the precise control when switching from tracking to sniping or when quick changes between different sensitivity settings are needed. All with the simple touch of a button.
  • Allow for high precision tracking and cursor placement even when lifted off of the moussing surface. Even quick movements and repositions continue to provide smooth, reliable performance.
  • Switch weapons rapidly so you can easily select and use the right weapon in your arsenal.
  • Smooth performance that works allows the mouse to glide effortlessly across almost any surface.

The Corsair Gaming M65 is the premium performance gaming mouse for First Person Shooter (FPS) games. An enthusiast grade 8200 dpi laser sensor provides for maximum precision, ultra responsive mouse control for extended domination over players with less accurate, slower mice. Designed and tuned for exceptional FPS gameplay, the M65’s ergonomic design is comfortable to the hand even for extended hours gaming sessions. The dedicated sniper button instantly lowers your DPI so that you can quickly an

List Price: $ 54.99

Price: $ 47.92

M60 Spare Barrel Bag

M60 Spare Barrel Bag

  • M60 Spare Barrel Bag

M60 Spare Barrel Bag. These were used to carry a spare barrel / bipod for the M60 along with change mitt, tool, etc. Overall very good used condition, the bag show wear, etc. but do not have any large holes or tears and all zippers work. Colors and markings may vary slightly as they are an issued item.

List Price: $ 30.00

Price: $ 30.00


Linker / Delinker for M60, M134, M240 in .308, 7.62x51

$549.00
End Date: Saturday Sep-10-2016 14:39:07 PDT
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M60 Reain replica Gun with bipod
$345.00
End Date: Wednesday Sep-7-2016 18:55:22 PDT
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Find More M60 Products

Magnum Enterprises Sniper Rifle

Magnum Enterprises Sniper Rifle

Magnum Enterprises Sniper Rifle

  • Magnum Sniper Rifle is one of our toughest, best handling rubber band guns
  • 12-shot rubber band rifle is ”chambered” for Magnum’s blue rubber bands (sold separately)
  • Uses NON-LETHAL rubber band ammunition for a fun and safe shooting experience
  • Recommended for ages 14 years and above, please use with adult supervision
  • Magnum 12 products are 100% American made using solid poplar hardwood, with company-owned plastic fittings you won’t find anywhere else
  • Recommended for ages 14 years and above; please use with adult supervision

From the Manufacturer; Magnum Junior M-60 Rifle with Scope and Sling is a beautifully detailed rubber band weapon with a 12-shot, semi-automatic trigger. The real-life M-60 machine gun was type classified in 1957 by the U.S. Army. It fires the standard NATO 7.62mm round and is used as a general support weapon. The real M-60 has a removable barrel which can be changed easily to prevent overheating. That’s the real one. The Magnum12 version won’t ever overheat, but the action can be ”Hot, hot, ho

List Price: $ 35.21

Price: $ 35.21

The Universal Soldier M151A2 “Mutt” Jeep & Trailer w/ M60 Machine Gun & Mount for 12 Inch Figures

The Universal Soldier M151A2 “Mutt” Jeep & Trailer w/ M60 Machine Gun & Mount for 12 Inch Figures

The Universal Soldier M151A2

  • Full Action Highly Detailed Vehicle for 12″ figures
  • Vietman Era Issue
  • With Trailer and M60 Machine Gun & Mount
  • Vehicle hold 2 or more 12 Inch figures(not included)
  • Works with G I Joe, Dragon and Universal Soldier Figures

This full action M151A2 “Mutt” Jeep & Trailer with M60 Machine gun and mount works with G I Joe, Dragon and Universal Soldier 12 inch Figures. Set includes: Vietnam Era Mutt & Trailer, pedestal mounted M60achine gun with ammo can & belt, removable gas can, ANVRC 46 radio/receiver and hand mike with command antenna, folding front windshield, and full scale trailer wih tie downs and hitch. *For ages 5 and up but considered an Adult collectible

List Price: $ 159.95

Price: $ 159.95

More M60 Machine Gun Products

Helicopter – Photo by Grapeman 1967

Check out these m60 machine gun images:

Helicopter – Photo by Grapeman 1967
m60 machine gun
Image by tommy japan
Young Crewchief

Yashica 35mm Rangefinder. Republic of South Vietnam 1967. 117th AHC (Assault Helicopter Company). Standing beside the M60 machine gun and

helicopter 66-794.

Vietnam Era Fire Truck, plenty of firepower
m60 machine gun
Image by genlocair
Veterans Day parade Austin Texas 2010

The prize
m60 machine gun
Image by Mads Boedker
Scene: Ravenswood, outback QLD, a gas station/post office. Me: "Why do you have an M60 Machine gun on the wall?" Shopkeeper: "Oh, it´s the owner´s, she won it in a raffle"

Can´t make that stuff up.

Magnum Enterprises Wooden M-60 Pistol

Magnum Enterprises Wooden M-60 Pistol

Magnum Enterprises Wooden M-60 Pistol

  • The M-60 now comes in a handheld version! This compact pistol fires safe rubber bands for maximum fun
  • Proudly made in the U.S.A.!
  • Great for pretend play, encourages social skills, hand-eye coordination and expands the imagination
  • Perfect for beginners or enthusiasts this pistol has a 12-shot semi-automatic trigger
  • Overall gun length: 14.25″ | Rubber band stretch: 10.75″ | Size #32 red rubber band ammo (sold separately) | For ages 14 & up

Get your kids active! All-American toys from Magnum are made in the U.S.A. and designed to engage and excite. Every Magnum toy is crafted with care for the best possible experience. The classic M-60 machine gun takes on a compact form as a handheld pistol! Twelve shots and a semi-automatic trigger will stretch size #32 red rubber bands to 10.75″ inches and release them with smooth firing action. The M-60 pistol is perfect for beginners or gun enthusiasts! A great toy for kids to help develop

List Price: $ 24.99

Price: $ 24.99

TAHK Tank 1:35 U.S M-60 Machine Gun – Resin Detail Accessory #A-41

TAHK Tank 1:35 U.S M-60 Machine Gun - Resin Detail Accessory #A-41

  • Model Kit
  • unassembled & unpainted model kit

TAHK Tank 1:35 U.S M-60 Machine Gun – Resin Detail Accessory #A-41

List Price: $ 11.35

Price: $ 11.35


Cross Fire 1/6 FAMAS MP5 AUG XM1014 M60 Machine Gun Set of 5 With Rack New

$45.99
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Vintage M-60 Machine Gun Multi-Tool 7790680 USA
$12.00
End Date: Monday Sep-26-2016 7:17:34 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $12.00
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More Machine Gun M60 Products

ADA in Vietnam – Searchlights

A few nice m60 machine gun images I found:

ADA in Vietnam – Searchlights
m60 machine gun
Image by Fidgit the Time Bandit
One display reads:

ADA in Vietnam – Searchlights

From the origins of American Air Defense, searchlights had been an integral facet of the branch’s responsibilities. While the battlefields of South Vietnam were far different from those encountered by air defense units in WWI, WWII or Korea, battlefield illumination remained a necessity to fight at night.

In early 1966, General Westmoreland requested searchlight support to illuminate remote outposts and mitigate the massed infantry attacks practiced by the North Vietnamese Army and Vietcong irregulars against those distant firebases. The first lights in-theater were WWII vintage 60” carbon arc searchlights and slightly newer 30” carbon arc lights. These proved vulnerable to small arms fire and were quickly relegated to duty in or near South Vietnam’s few cities. However, the 23” VSS-1 Xenon Searchlight, normally mounted on the M48 tank was quickly modified to mount in the back of an M151A1 jeep.

Introduced in 1960, the M151 replaced earlier MB / GPW and M38 series 1/4 ton utility trucks (known as “jeeps”) in US military service. While M151s were standard equipment in most Army units, they played a crucial role in Army Air Defense Batteries in Vietnam.

The new searchlight system, designated AN / GSS-14 was powered directly from the vehicle with only minor modifications. A 100-amp regulator replaced the original 25-amp unit, allowing the jeep’s engine to serve as the light’s generator. The 100-million candlepower light had a straight-line range of five miles and nearly twice that if bounced off cloud cover.

Four separate Batteries of the 29th Artillery fielded the M151A1 / GSS-14 in South Vietnam, one per Corps Area. Three of those Batteries (B, G and I Batteries) were attached directly to an Automatic Weapons (M42 Duster) Battalion and worked in concert with Dusters and Quad-.50s, while the fourth (H Battery) was attached to the 164th Aviation Battalion. In addition to the GSS-14, B Battery began a combat trial with the more powerful TVS-3 30” Xenon Searchlight in 1969.

The Vietnam War was Air Defense’s last combat use of searchlights. By the end of the war, night division devices were being used with regularity and the ability to illuminate an enemy position was far outweighed by the ability to see that position in the blackest of nights using a night vision device.

The next display reads:

TVS-3 Searchlight

In 1966, the Commanding General, US Army Vietnam requested a replacement for the 30” carbon arc searchlights then in use with the US Army. While the Xenon VSS-1 used on the M48 tank was readily available and almost immediately pressed into service mounted on M151A1 jeeps, a larger light of 30” was required. The 1.2 billion candlepower TVS-3 searchlight was undergoing stateside testing in the mid-1960s and by 1968 their presence was requested in South Vietnam.

In March 1969, nine 30” Xenon TVS-3 searchlights were sent to South Vietnam for a 60 operational evaluation. Six were assigned to I Field Force Vietnam and one to II Field Force with two spares held as replacements as needed. The six lights sent to I Field Force were situated on mountain tops in the II Corps area. From these mountaintops, B Battery lights could illuminate nearly any point on the II Corps coastline, provide direct illumination nearly 20 miles inland and indirect illumination to support night vision operations at almost twice that distance. While the TVS-3 operational test was only planned for 60 days, the lights remained in-country through early 1971 and were used to great effect in both illumination and firebase defense roles.

H Battery operated in IV Corps, supporting units of the 9th Infantry Division and the 164th Aviation Battalion. It was the only one of the four searchlight batteries not attached to a Duster battalion.

The Xenon 1.2 billion candlepower light had a range of over twenty-five miles, providing battlefield illumination for friendly forces.

M60s were frequently found with searchlight jeeps, allowing the light operators to put a significant volume of fire on enemy positions once detected.

Citation:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Randall W. King, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force, on 22 February 1969, while serving as a Searchlight Crewman with Battery I (Searchlight), 29th Artillery Regiment, II Field Force Artillery, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Sergeant King and his Section Chief were providing illumination on the eastern perimeter of Long Binh Post. Sergeant King monitored a radio message reporting rocket flashes and rounds impacting on the southern perimeter. With complete disregard for his safety, he and his Section Chief headed their open searchlight vehicle toward the heavily bombarded south perimeter moving directly through an intense mortar and grenade barrage. Arriving at a bunker, they discovered several wounded soldiers on the ground. At great risk to his own life, Sergeant King assisted in the evacuation of these men to a jeep in the rear, although the area was under peak mortar and rocket attack and intense automatic weapons fire. After the wounded had been evacuated, Sergeant King took up a fighting position on the perimeter and laid down a high volume of suppressive fire. As he continued in his efforts to defend the searchlight position, a mortar round landed near his bunker and metal fragments knocked the weapon from his hands, temporarily blinding him. With his weapon inoperative and the other men in his bunker low on ammunition, Sergeant King volunteered to go for a resupply. On his third trip, he encountered a wounded man and carried the man to safety. He then returned to the searchlight position and proceeded to place effective machine gun fire on the enemy. Sergeant King’s gallantry and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

Citation:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Joey W. Clements, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Searchlight Crewman with Battery I (Searchlight), 2nd Battalion, 29th Artillery Regiment, II Field Force, on 14 June 1970, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Private First Class Clements and his Section Chief were operating a searchlight on the defensive perimeter of their Base when their element suddenly received heavy enemy mortar and rocket-propelled grenade fire. In the initial moments of contact, his Section Chief was wounded, and Private Clements was forced to engage the advancing enemy with a machine gun until he had expended his ammunition. He then left to replenish his ammunition supply, and as he returned to the defensive position with the additional ammunition, he received severe shrapnel wounds in both legs and his chest. Refusing to be evacuated, he manned the machine gun and continued to provide effective suppressive fire. As he maneuvered to another position, he received arm wounds by a grenade. Still refusing aid, he manned the new position until the enemy broke contact. Private Clements’ gallantry was instrumental in the repelling of the hostile force. Private First Class Clements’ actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Another display reads:

30” AN / TVS-3 Xenon Searchlight

“We Light ‘Em, You Fight ‘Em”

Nine TVS-3 searchlights arrived in South Vietnam in March 1969 and were immediately emplaced in strategic locations across South Vietnam’s Central Highlands. The 1.2 billion candlepower lights enabled battlefield illumination up to 20 miles from the searchlight’s location, allowing for instantaneous illumination of remote outposts along the Cambodian and Laotian borders that were subject to frequent nighttime NVA Sapper attacks.

The TVS-3 quickly proved invaluable in the defense of friendly positions and remained in-theater far longer than its initial 60-day evaluation period. B Battery, 7th Battalion, 29th Artillery (Searchlight) operated the TVS-3 throughout the 1969 – 1971 timeframe.

The final display reads:

Air Defense Units in Vietnam

The US air defense role in the Republic of Vietnam was straightforward: defend friendly ground forces from air and ground attack. The equipment Air Defenders had at their disposal ranged from World War 2 vintage M55 Quad-.50 caliber machine gun turrets to the cutting edge MIM-23 Hawk Missile System.

Arriving in South Vietnam in early 1966 as “Artillery” battalions and separate batteries, Air Defenders served under I and II Field Force, providing convoy escort, firebase defense, battlefield illumination and an air defense umbrella over friendly territory that was second to none.

Three battalions and eight separate batteries covered friendly skies from the DMZ south to the Mekong Delta. Two additional battalions provided medium range air defense for the cities of Da Nang and Saigon from the very real threat of North Vietnamese IL-28 medium bombers.

In July 1968, Air Defense split from the Artillery branch and became an independent branch of the US Army. Although relatively few in number, Air Defenders in Vietnam made an indelible impression on the US experience in Vietnam and those battalions returned home in 1972 as the combat-experienced core of the Army’s newest branch.

Taken December 13th, 2013.

U.S. Forces in Somalia – Department of Defense Joint Combat Camera Center DD-SD-00-00688
m60 machine gun
Image by expertinfantry
www.expertinfantry.com

Two Marines sit behind a wall of sand bags about three feet high. They stand Christmas Day watch atop the roof of the old American School in the former Amercian Embassy compound in Mogadishu, Somalia. PFC Mario Munoz, of Glendora, California, is on the right side of the frame and sits next to a M60 Machine Gun. LCPL Conrad Robinson, of Albany, Georgia, is near the top of the frame and holds a portable two-way radio. This mission is in support of Operation Restore Hope.

Nice Machine Gun M60 photos

Check out these machine gun m60 images:

Selena Narayanasamy – Pre PubCon AtacTV Event
machine gun m60
Image by planetc1
A group of us were invited to experience shooting handguns, AK47s, and M60 machine guns the day before PubCon Las Vegas. It was a great event and I personally felt I learned a lot about gun safety and handling.

I made this photo available to you via Creative Commons so that you can use it in blog posts, for marketing materials, as an avatar, or share it with friends. Photo credit (Photo by Michael Dorausch) and a link (michaeldorausch.com) when possible are greatly appreciated. Help keep me motivated to share my photography.

If you want high resolution originals, tweet or DM me on Twitter @chiropractic.

An M60 at the Củ Chi Tunnels shooting range, Vietnam
machine gun m60
Image by jamehand
The Củ Chi Tunnels shooting range where you can fire a number of assault rifles, such as the M16 or the AK-47 as well as a light machine gun like the M60. I chose an M16 (not pictured) and repeatedly missed my target at around 100 metres. Check out more from my travels around Vietnam and Cambodia at jameshandlon.com/category/indochina-adventure/

Brian LaFrance – Pre PubCon AtacTV Event
machine gun m60
Image by planetc1
A group of us were invited to experience shooting handguns, AK47s, and M60 machine guns the day before PubCon Las Vegas. It was a great event and I personally felt I learned a lot about gun safety and handling.

I made this photo available to you via Creative Commons so that you can use it in blog posts, for marketing materials, as an avatar, or share it with friends. Photo credit (Photo by Michael Dorausch) and a link (michaeldorausch.com) when possible are greatly appreciated. Help keep me motivated to share my photography.

If you want high resolution originals, tweet or DM me on Twitter @chiropractic.