Nice M60 Machine Guns photos

Some cool m60 machine guns images:

U.S. Forces in Somalia – Department of Defense Joint Combat Camera Center DD-SD-00-00902
m60 machine guns
Image by expertinfantry
www.expertinfantry.com

Low angle shot looking up at US Army PFC Steven Battle holding a M60 Machine Gun in his right arm. He’s pointing it in the air. Battle, a 10th Mountain Division Soldier from Rochester, New York, keeps a close watch on a road leading to the intersection he is posted at during a sunset raid on the Somali village of Afgooye. This mission is in direct support of Operation Restore Hope.

ADA in Vietnam – M42 Duster
m60 machine guns
Image by Fidgit the Time Bandit
The display reads:

ADA in Vietnam – M42 Duster

Combat experience in the Korea War quickly showed that while the M19 40mm Gun Motor Carriage was a capable platform, it needed improvement. By 1952, a new anti-aircraft tank was in development, designated the T141. The new vehicle used the same turret and gun mount from the M19, but mated it with the larger, more powerful M41 Walker Bulldog light tank hull. The resulting vehicle was standardized as the M42 40mm Gun Motor Carriage by 1952 and entered full production that year.

However, with the service entry of the Nike Ajax system in 1953, the Army was focused on missile systems and with the introduction of the Hawk missile in the late 1950s, the M42 was quickly passed to National Guard units and all but removed from the active inventory by 1963.

Just two years later, US forces entered combat in South Vietnam. Two Hawk missile battalions were deployed to provide air defense around Saigon and along the DMZ, but an additional system was needed to cover potential low-altitude threats. In addition to the air defense requirement, the Army also needed a vehicle that could provide heavy firepower for both convoy escort and firebase defense. The M42 was back in demand and by the beginning of 1966, three battalions were formed for service in Vietnam.

Those three units, 1st Battalion, 44th Artillery; 4th Battalion, 60th Artillery; and 5th Battalion, 2nd Artillery arrived in-theater by mid-year and immediately had a significant impact on operations in their respective areas of operation. Each “Duster” battalion had a quad .50 battery and searchlight battery attached, forming an air defense task force that could respond to both air and ground threats, day or night.

On 20 June 1968, Air Defense and Field Artillery split the Artillery branch and the Duster, Quad, Searchlight and Hawk units were then designated ADA rather than “Artillery,” with the parenthetical Automatic Weapons, Searchlight or Guided Missile designation.

The story of Army Air Defense in Vietnam provides a fascinating contrast to the operations and equipment of the rest of the branch during the 1960s and early 1970s. While Army Air Defense of the day was focused on the strategic threat of a Soviet nuclear strike and were using the latest technology to deter that threat, the three ADA Duster battalions effectively used weapon systems from the “last war” to provide low altitude air defense and on-call direct fire support to infantry and artillery units across the entirety of South Vietnam from 1966 through 1972.

M42 Duster Specifications:

Weight: 50,000 lbs fully loaded
Height: 9 feet 4 inches
Length: 19 feet
Width: 10 feet 7 inches
Crew: Commander, driver, two loaders, two gunners
Armament: Two M2A1 40mm automatic anti-aircraft guns with 240 rounds per gun; 1-2 7.62 M60 Machine Guns with 1,750 rounds
Main Armament Rate of Fire: 120 rounds per minute, per gun
Engine: Continental AOS-895-3 6-cylinder opposed gasoline engine
Range: 100 miles
Speed 45 mph

The museum’s Duster served with the 1-44th Artillery in 1968.

The Duster occasionally towed the M332 ammunition trailer, which doubled the Duster’s ammunition capacity. However, it would be a liability in combat and would normally be removed before the Duster would be used in the convoy escort role.

Most Dusters in Vietnam carried some form of artwork. Usually the crew would name both the front hatch and the gun shield above the main armament.

Sergeant Mitchell W. Stout was born in Lenoir City, Tennessee on 24 February, 1950. He enlisted in the Army on 15 August 1967 and served his first tour in Vietnam as a rifleman with the 2nd Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment in the Mekong Delta from August 1968 to August 1969. After completing his first tour, SGT Stout rotated back to the US, but returned to South Vietnam just five months later as a M42 Duster crewman.

Three months into his second tour, SGT Stout was commanding an M42 Duster at the Khe Gio bridge along Route 9, a strategic east-west route that was the supply lifeline to friendly outposts in western I Corps.

SGT Mitchell Stout
C/1-44th Artillery (Automatic Weapons), Khe Gio Bridge

The U.S. Army outpost at Khe Gio Bridge on Highway 9 near the DMZ was overrun by North Vietnamese troops on 12 March 1970. Fourteen Americans held the outpost along with a platoon of ARVN Infantry. Two M42 Dusters from C Battery 1-44th Artillery gave the small force a significant amount of firepower to protect the bridge, while an M151A1 searchlight jeep from G Battery, 29th Artillery provided nighttime battlefield illumination. Of those fourteen Americans, two were killed in action, five wounded and one was captured. Yet they fought valiantly and protected the bridge on Route 9, sparing it from destruction. Sergeant Mitchell Stout’s actions during the battle would earn him a posthumous Medal of Honor:

Citation:

Sgt. Stout distinguished himself during an attack by a North Vietnamese Army Sapper company on his unit’s firing position at Khe Gio Bridge. Sgt. Stout was in a bunker with members of a searchlight crew when the position came under heavy enemy mortar fire and ground attack. When the intensity of the mortar attack subsided, an enemy grenade was thrown into the bunker. Displaying great courage, Sgt. Stout ran to the grenade, picked it up, and started out of the bunker. As he reached the door, the grenade exploded. By holding the grenade close to his body and shielding its blast, he protected his fellow soldiers in the bunker from further injury or death. Sgt. Stout’s conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action, at the cost of his own life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the U.S. Army.

Taken December 13th, 2013.

Machine Gun 7.62mm M60 Operation and Cycle of Functioning 1960 US Army

more at: http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html

“DESIGN AND CAPABILITIES – OPERATION – LOADING, AIMING, COCKING, FIRING, UNLOADING – FUNCTIONING – FEEDING, CHAMBERING, LOCKING, FIRING, EXTRACTION, EJECTING, COCKING.”

US Army training film TF9-2971

NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJJs3kalX8s

Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts.

US Army Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0C7C6CCF1C0DEBB3

Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though far from perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M60_machine_gun

The M60 (formally named United States Machine Gun, Caliber 7.62 mm, M60) is a family of American general-purpose machine guns firing 7.62×51mm NATO cartridges from a disintegrating belt of M13 links. There are several types of live ammunition approved for use in the M60, including ball, tracer, and armor-piercing rounds.

Introduced in 1957, it has served with every branch of the U.S. military and still serves with other armed forces. Its manufacture and continued upgrade for military and commercial purchase continues into the 21st century, though it has been replaced or supplemented in most roles by other designs, notably the M240 in U.S. service.

The M60 is a belt-fed machine gun that fires the 7.62 mm NATO cartridge (.308 winchester) commonly used in larger rifles. It is generally used as crew-served weapon and operated by a team of two or three individuals. The team consists of the gunner, the assistant gunner (AG in military slang), and the ammunition bearer. The gun’s weight and the amount of ammunition it consumes when fired make it difficult for a single soldier to carry and operate. The gunner carries the weapon and, depending on his strength and stamina, anywhere from 200 to 1000 rounds of ammunition. The assistant carries a spare barrel and extra ammunition, and reloads and spots targets for the gunner. The ammunition bearer carries additional ammunition and the tripod with associated traversing and elevation mechanism, if issued, and fetches more ammunition as needed during firing.

The M60 can be accurately fired at short ranges from the shoulder due to its design. This was an initial requirement for the design and a hold-over in concept from the M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle. It may also be fired from the integral bipod, M122 tripod, and some other mounts.

M60 ammunition comes in a cloth bandolier containing a cardboard box of 100 pre-linked rounds. The M60 changed from M1 link to the different M13 link, a change from the older link system with which it was not compatible. The cloth bandolier is reinforced to allow it to be hung from the current version of the feed tray. Historically, units in Vietnam used B3A cans from C-rations packs locked into the ammunition box attachment system to roll the ammunition belts over for a straighter and smoother feed to the loading port to enhance reliability of feed. The later models changed the ammunition box attachment point and made this adaptation unnecessary.

The M60 machine gun began development in the late 1940s as a program for a new, lighter 7.62 mm machine gun. It was derived from German machine guns of World War II (most notably the FG 42 and to a lesser extent the MG 42), but it contained American innovations as well. Early prototypes, notably the T52 and T161 bore a close resemblance to both the M1941 Johnson machine gun and the FG-42. It was intended to replace the M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle and M1919A6 Browning machine gun in the squad automatic weapon role, and in the medium machine gun role. One of the weapons tested against it during its procurement process was the FN MAG.

The U.S. Army officially adopted the M60 in 1957. It later served in the Vietnam War as a squad automatic weapon with many U.S. units. Every soldier in the rifle squad would carry an additional 200 linked rounds of ammunition for the M60, a spare barrel, or both…

Batterie Dell Latitude C510

La conférence de Paris peut-elle être un succès ?
Cela dépend de la façon de mesurer le succès. Si elle permet à tous les pays de prendre conscience que rester passif face au réchauffement climatique est impossible, ce sera déjà une victoire. C’est aussi l’occasion de souligner que la lutte contre le réchauffement n’est pas seulement l’affaire des Etats, mais bien aussi des entreprises et des citoyens. En revanche, si l’on prend comme seul indicateur de succès le nombre de signataires des accords, ainsi que leur contenu, il est trop tôt pour savoir. J’ai bon espoir.

Selon vous, que peuvent faire les entreprises ?
Nous avons un rôle important à jouer, car une partie de la solution contre le réchauffement climatique passe par la technologie qui apporte des possibilités nouvelles, difficilement imaginables il y a quelques années. Et c’est ce que nous faisons, en anticipant les prochaines avancées technologiques.

Vous avez beaucoup misé sur les véhicules électriques. Etes-vous toujours aussi enthousiaste à leur sujet ?
Je suis toujours enthousiaste, mais également impatient, car, pour l’instant, les développements commerciaux ne répondent pas encore à nos ambitions. Je sais que le pari technique est réussi : personne ne doute plus du fait que la voiture électrique est une voiture “normale” et sans risques. La réussite du pari commercial dépend, elle, de l’infrastructure de charge. Le conducteur est préoccupé par les infrastructures. Pour les voitures à essence, on se pose rarement la question de l’autonomie, parce qu’il existe des stations-service partout. Là, il faut un effort concerté entre les entreprises, les Etats et les communautés pour développer cette infrastructure de charge. Nous devons déployer des postes de chargement efficaces à des coûts raisonnables. La durée de charge des batteries va diminuer progressivement. Dans trois ou quatre ans, une charge rapide ne prendra pas beaucoup plus de temps qu’un plein d’essence. Nous travaillons aussi sur l’autonomie de la batterie, qui sera multipliée par deux au plus tard en 2020.

L’autre frein au développement de la voiture électrique est son prix. Quand baissera-t-il ?
La baisse du prix des véhicules électriques dépend de la hausse des ventes. Plus les volumes augmenteront, moins on aura besoin des aides des Etats. Aujourd’hui, ces aides sont un investissement pour lancer des productions de masse de voitures électriques.

Il a la bonne humeur communicative Otys. D’autant plus ce soir-là qu’il s’apprête à faire ce qu’il aime : chanter. Vendredi dernier, le Dieppois a retrouvé « ses potes musicos » : Stefano au clavier, Olivier à la batterie, Loïc à la basse et JB à la guitare. Les cinq musiciens ont investi le studio de la Maison des associations pour enregistrer Qui c’est celui-là ? le tube de Pierre Vassiliu sorti en 1973.

C’est la première fois qu’Otys fait une reprise. « J’ai remarqué que pour se faire connaître, il fallait reprendre une chanson. J’ai donc décidé de le faire moi aussi. Mais attention, sourit-il, je n’ai pas choisi cette chanson par hasard. J’adore Pierre Vassiliu et en particulier ce titre, mais il en a fait bien d’autres tout aussi sympa ».

Faire le buzz

Le chanteur a fait quelques écarts dans les paroles qu’il s’est réappropriées. « Qu’est-ce qu’il fait, qu’est-ce qu’il a, qui c’est celui-là ? Complètement toqué, ce mec-là » est ainsi devenu « Qu’est-ce qu’il fait, qu’est-ce qu’il a, qui c’est celui-là ? Complètement toqué, ce black-là ». « Je me suis inspiré de ma vie, de ce que je suis pour transformer les paroles » confie Otys. D’ailleurs, toutes les chansons qu’il écrit « sont du vécu » poursuit-il.

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More M60 Articles

Evike IWI Licensed TAVOR TAR-21 Airsoft AEG Rifle by Umarex w/ Metal Gearbox (Dark Earth / Competition Series) – (39918) Reviews

Evike IWI Licensed TAVOR TAR-21 Airsoft AEG Rifle by Umarex w/ Metal Gearbox (Dark Earth / Competition Series) – (39918)

Evike IWI Licensed TAVOR TAR-21 Airsoft AEG Rifle by Umarex w/ Metal Gearbox (Dark Earth / Competition Series) - (39918)

  • New Gen hopup system, flip-up front and rear sights, and installed top rail
  • Compact size bullpup design for CQB and field gaming
  • High strength polymer body and frame; Durable metal gearbox with metal internals
  • Quick-Change Spring Gearbox
  • 330~360 FPS (measured with 0.20g BBs) with included 300 round high capacity magazine

*Scope in image not included

“T.A.R. 21” stands for “Tavor Assault Rifle – 21st Century”. The T.A.R. 21 was selected as the assault rifle of the Israeli Defense Forces, is the standard Israeli infantry weapon, and is also being employed by Spec-Ops units across the globe. The TAR21 is popular for it’s bullpup design that shortens the length of the rifle w/o sacrificing barrel length. The TAR21 features a fiber reinforced polymer body, upgradable metal gearbox, and metal outer barrel. Fl

List Price: $ 174.95

Price: $ 174.95

Evike High Concentration Silicone Oil Lubricant for Airsoft GBB / AEG Guns (50ml) – (44392)

Evike High Concentration Silicone Oil Lubricant for Airsoft GBB / AEG Guns (50ml) - (44392)

  • No Petroleum Distillates
  • Safe on All Surfaces / Materials
  • Wide Temperature Range and Superb Thermal Stability
  • Excellent Plastic & Rubber Compatibility
  • Precision Application Tip

*Guns not included
Evike High Concentration Silicone Oil Lubricant is suitable for all Gas and Electric internal components. Silicone oil has a wide variety of uses including, but not limited to, Cylinders, Gas Blowback Units, Valves, O-rings, Gears, Propane Adapters, Tools, Nozzles, Trigger Mechanisms, and more.

Features:
• High Viscosity Formulation
• No Petroleum Distillates
• Safe on All Surfaces / Materials
• Water Resistant
• Wide Temperature Rang

List Price: $ 6.00

Price: $ 6.00

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Nvidia Tesla M60 16GB Server GPU Accelerator Processing Card HP 803273-001

Nvidia Tesla M60 16GB Server GPU Accelerator Processing Card HP 803273-001

Nvidia Tesla M60 16GB Server GPU Accelerator Processing Card HP 803273-001

CUDA Cores: 4096 Viewpref 12*: 60×2 Single Precition: 7.4 TFLOPs Memory size: 16 GB GDDR5 H.264.1080p30 streams: 36 From factor: PCIe 3.0 Dual Slot

List Price: $ 3,899.98

Price: $ 4,934.51

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Evike H&K HK416 Full Size Airsoft AEG Rifle Package by Umarex – (39971)

Evike H&K HK416 Full Size Airsoft AEG Rifle Package by Umarex – (39971)

Evike H&K HK416 Full Size Airsoft AEG Rifle Package by Umarex - (39971)

  • Made from high grade ABS polymer
  • Front railed handguard
  • Flip-up front and rear sights
  • Battery and charger included
  • ~340 FPS (Measured with 0.12g BBs)

Features:
• Fully licensed by Heckler & Koch
• Made from high grade ABS polymer
• Front railed handguard; Great for tactical accessories
• Flip-up front and rear sights
• Battery and charger included

Length: 725mm-795mm, Adjustable
Magazine Capacity: 250rd Hi-Capacity
Muzzle Velocity: ~340 FPS (Measured with 0.12g BBs)
Fire Modes: Semi/Full-Auto, Safety
Package Includes: Gun, Magazine, Battery, Charger
Battery: 7.2v Small Type recommende

List Price: $ 80.00

Price: $ 80.00

5 Custom Army Builder 2.5″ US Weapons pack : M4 Carbine with M203, M16 Assault Rifle, M16A2 w/GL, M110 Sniper, M60 Machine Gun

5 Custom Army Builder 2.5″ US Weapons pack : M4 Carbine with M203, M16 Assault Rifle, M16A2 w/GL, M110 Sniper, M60 Machine Gun

5 Custom Army Builder 2.5

  • Custom LEGO® Minifigure Compatible Guns by CombatBrick.com
  • MATERIAL: ABS plastic injection molded items, COLOR: solid black SIZE: 1.5-2 in.
  • A selection of classic and new US weaposn:
  • M16 Assault Rifle, M4 Carbine with Grenade Launcher, M16A2 with M203, M110 Semi-automatic Sniper rifle, M60 machine gun
  • LEGO® is a registered trademark of The LEGO Group which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this product.

Highly detailed, these toy weapons fit perfectly into LEGO® world and Minifg hand. They represent the most capable and battlefield proven guns from the Modern Warfare era of real world, retrofitted into the toy universe. Arm you LEGO® Minifigures with the best! LEGO® is a registered trademark of The LEGO Group which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this product.

List Price: $ 6.00

Price: $ 6.00

U.S. Ordnance M60E4 MK43 Commando 4000rd Machine Gun METAL M60 Airsoft AEG Rifle

$379.95
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More M60 Machine Gun Products

Nice M60 Machine Gun photos

A few nice m60 machine gun images I found:

M60_USMC_DSC_0079
m60 machine gun
Image by wbaiv

M60_A3_DSC_0141
m60 machine gun
Image by wbaiv

ADA in Vietnam – M42 Duster
m60 machine gun
Image by Fidgit the Time Bandit
The display reads:

ADA in Vietnam – M42 Duster

Combat experience in the Korea War quickly showed that while the M19 40mm Gun Motor Carriage was a capable platform, it needed improvement. By 1952, a new anti-aircraft tank was in development, designated the T141. The new vehicle used the same turret and gun mount from the M19, but mated it with the larger, more powerful M41 Walker Bulldog light tank hull. The resulting vehicle was standardized as the M42 40mm Gun Motor Carriage by 1952 and entered full production that year.

However, with the service entry of the Nike Ajax system in 1953, the Army was focused on missile systems and with the introduction of the Hawk missile in the late 1950s, the M42 was quickly passed to National Guard units and all but removed from the active inventory by 1963.

Just two years later, US forces entered combat in South Vietnam. Two Hawk missile battalions were deployed to provide air defense around Saigon and along the DMZ, but an additional system was needed to cover potential low-altitude threats. In addition to the air defense requirement, the Army also needed a vehicle that could provide heavy firepower for both convoy escort and firebase defense. The M42 was back in demand and by the beginning of 1966, three battalions were formed for service in Vietnam.

Those three units, 1st Battalion, 44th Artillery; 4th Battalion, 60th Artillery; and 5th Battalion, 2nd Artillery arrived in-theater by mid-year and immediately had a significant impact on operations in their respective areas of operation. Each “Duster” battalion had a quad .50 battery and searchlight battery attached, forming an air defense task force that could respond to both air and ground threats, day or night.

On 20 June 1968, Air Defense and Field Artillery split the Artillery branch and the Duster, Quad, Searchlight and Hawk units were then designated ADA rather than “Artillery,” with the parenthetical Automatic Weapons, Searchlight or Guided Missile designation.

The story of Army Air Defense in Vietnam provides a fascinating contrast to the operations and equipment of the rest of the branch during the 1960s and early 1970s. While Army Air Defense of the day was focused on the strategic threat of a Soviet nuclear strike and were using the latest technology to deter that threat, the three ADA Duster battalions effectively used weapon systems from the “last war” to provide low altitude air defense and on-call direct fire support to infantry and artillery units across the entirety of South Vietnam from 1966 through 1972.

M42 Duster Specifications:

Weight: 50,000 lbs fully loaded
Height: 9 feet 4 inches
Length: 19 feet
Width: 10 feet 7 inches
Crew: Commander, driver, two loaders, two gunners
Armament: Two M2A1 40mm automatic anti-aircraft guns with 240 rounds per gun; 1-2 7.62 M60 Machine Guns with 1,750 rounds
Main Armament Rate of Fire: 120 rounds per minute, per gun
Engine: Continental AOS-895-3 6-cylinder opposed gasoline engine
Range: 100 miles
Speed 45 mph

The museum’s Duster served with the 1-44th Artillery in 1968.

The Duster occasionally towed the M332 ammunition trailer, which doubled the Duster’s ammunition capacity. However, it would be a liability in combat and would normally be removed before the Duster would be used in the convoy escort role.

Most Dusters in Vietnam carried some form of artwork. Usually the crew would name both the front hatch and the gun shield above the main armament.

Sergeant Mitchell W. Stout was born in Lenoir City, Tennessee on 24 February, 1950. He enlisted in the Army on 15 August 1967 and served his first tour in Vietnam as a rifleman with the 2nd Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment in the Mekong Delta from August 1968 to August 1969. After completing his first tour, SGT Stout rotated back to the US, but returned to South Vietnam just five months later as a M42 Duster crewman.

Three months into his second tour, SGT Stout was commanding an M42 Duster at the Khe Gio bridge along Route 9, a strategic east-west route that was the supply lifeline to friendly outposts in western I Corps.

SGT Mitchell Stout
C/1-44th Artillery (Automatic Weapons), Khe Gio Bridge

The U.S. Army outpost at Khe Gio Bridge on Highway 9 near the DMZ was overrun by North Vietnamese troops on 12 March 1970. Fourteen Americans held the outpost along with a platoon of ARVN Infantry. Two M42 Dusters from C Battery 1-44th Artillery gave the small force a significant amount of firepower to protect the bridge, while an M151A1 searchlight jeep from G Battery, 29th Artillery provided nighttime battlefield illumination. Of those fourteen Americans, two were killed in action, five wounded and one was captured. Yet they fought valiantly and protected the bridge on Route 9, sparing it from destruction. Sergeant Mitchell Stout’s actions during the battle would earn him a posthumous Medal of Honor:

Citation:

Sgt. Stout distinguished himself during an attack by a North Vietnamese Army Sapper company on his unit’s firing position at Khe Gio Bridge. Sgt. Stout was in a bunker with members of a searchlight crew when the position came under heavy enemy mortar fire and ground attack. When the intensity of the mortar attack subsided, an enemy grenade was thrown into the bunker. Displaying great courage, Sgt. Stout ran to the grenade, picked it up, and started out of the bunker. As he reached the door, the grenade exploded. By holding the grenade close to his body and shielding its blast, he protected his fellow soldiers in the bunker from further injury or death. Sgt. Stout’s conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action, at the cost of his own life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the U.S. Army.

Taken December 13th, 2013.